Langley Writes

about her rich and random life

Moving House June 7, 2011

Filed under: general drivel — Langley Writes @ 10:28 am

I love this blog for the content (lots of stuff about family and friends ♥) but I am abandoning it. Though many people love WordPress, it isn’t right for me. I’ve learned a lot about Blogger and feel more familiar and, therefore, productive there. So I’m packing this up and moving it over there. I’m just getting the new one up and running but I’ll include the link, in case you want to join me there. I hope you do, it’s been nice interacting with all of you over here and I would hate to lose contact. So, without further blah, blah, here is the link:

My Rich and Random Life

See you soon! 🙂

 

Happy Mother’s Day and why I feel like a heel May 7, 2011

Filed under: family,general drivel,gratitude,happiness,holidays,joy,poems — Langley Writes @ 5:00 pm
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Tomorrow is Mother’s Day. Wow, it got here fast. In fact, it snuck up on me, caught me unaware and unprepared. In truth, I have loads of viable excuses but come on, we’re talking about Mother’s Day. I could have and should have done better.

My mom reads this blog and I know that she knows how much I love her, how much she means to me. She knows this because we have a mushy (and forgiving!) family. We hug and laugh and love to the extreme. Out loud. For the world to see. She knows. But still, it’s Mother’s Day.

Mom, in her interminable style and grace, has given me (another) pass. She allowed me to postpone our Mother’s Day celebration. My mother and I will not celebrate Mother’s Day tomorrow. Because we live in different states, we will celebrate in a few weeks, when we can be together. I can’t wait to see her.

Here’s an excerpt from a lighthearted Mother’s Day poem I wrote last year:

Mom finds humor every day
Her laughter fills the air
Family time was joyous
We didn’t have a care   read more…

I posted this on Facebook today and want to post it here too:

This pic is of Mom & Dad when they were in the hospital having me. Look how young they were! Mom, I'm posting this in honor of Mother's Day. I love you.

Guess what mom’s comment was. When she saw the post she wrote: Was I ever that young and that small? And just think… we brought home the prize!

What a sweetie. Happy Mother’s Day Mom!

(Mea maxima culpa. I hope my brother and/or my sister have my back tomorrow!)

 

My First Car was a VW April 27, 2011

Filed under: general drivel — Langley Writes @ 1:09 pm

Yep, for those of you that are playing along, I’m sure you guessed it. My first car was … wait for it … a VW. How good is that? See how clever I am, writing about my first car to catch up with the A-Z Blogging Challenge. I’m behind on my V-day post and today is W-day so this works out peachy. Okay, enough with the self congratulations, let me think of how to turn this lucky coincidence into something you may find interesting to read.

It was a huge accomplishment, buying that car. I didn’t own anything at the time, and had no credit. The car was a white Volkswagen Jetta. Stripped bare. No power anything, but it was mine.

On my drive to work, I passed a corner building that was made of mirrors. There was a stoplight at that corner and I never minded when it was red. I got to look at my car’s profile in the mirror. It was a good looking car.

sxc.hu/SebHughes

The car was a lemon. It was a dud. I had to put oil in the engine every time I gassed up. At the time when I was counting every penny, I was buying more oil than food. Feeding my car better than I was feeding myself. So I got busy. I hounded the dealership. I was relentless. When I found no satisfaction there, I went to Volkswagen corporate. I made noise. I researched and quoted Lemon Laws. I stayed on them like a bad dream. After spending lots of energy,  Volkswagen sent a corporate mechanic to evaluate my car. It was, indeed, a lemon. I’m happy to report that they made it right. Yay for VW and yay for me.

Don’t give up.

 

T is for… Tea April 23, 2011

sxc.hu/makram

T is for tea because I love it. All kinds of tea. I’ve never tasted a tea that I didn’t like. I’ve had the good fortune of traveling all over the world. During my travels, I’ve had proper tea in England and explored a variety of green teas across Asia. Right here at home, I enjoy good, basic iced tea.

Being from the south, iced tea is a staple. But we didn’t drink iced tea growing up. My parents thought we needed milk to build bones so… we drank milk. At every meal. Very un-southern-like, milk was our go-to beverage. It wasn’t until I forged out on my own that I started my love affair with tea.

My vagabond days are over and I’ve settled down, back here in the south. Fortune smiles on me (again). The Charleston Tea Plantation is close to our house. America’s only working tea farm is right here, where I live.

Local tea. Fresh, delicious tea. Right here. Did I mention that I love tea?

If you want to read more about the Charleston Tea Plantation, check out these articles:

America’s Only Working Tea Farm is in Charleston, South Carolina

Making Tea at Charleston Tea Plantation in Charleston, South Carolina

Product Review: American Classic Tea in Pyramid Tea Bags

 

Super Siblings: I Won the Sweepstakes April 22, 2011

It’s true. I won the siblings sweepstakes. My brother and my sister are exceptional people. If they weren’t in my family, I’d still want to hang out with them. The three of us are wildly different but it works seamlessly. We all have our strengths, our ‘position’ within the familial unit. Birth order probably has something to do with the harmony, but so does personality. We just fit together. It makes sense.

It’s hard for me to summarize my relationship with my brother and my sister in a single post. In fact, I could write for days and not clearly communicate the depth of my respect and love for both of them. So I’m taking the easy road. I’ll let other, more articulate people speak for me. Here are some of my favorite quotes about siblings:

A sibling may be the keeper of one’s identity, the only person with the keys to one’s unfettered, more fundamental self.  ~Marian Sandmaier

We know one another’s faults, virtues, catastrophes, mortifications, triumphs, rivalries, desires, and how long we can each hang by our hands to a bar.  We have been banded together under pack codes and tribal laws.  ~Rose Macaulay

I don’t believe an accident of birth makes people sisters or brothers.  It makes them siblings, gives them mutuality of parentage.  Sisterhood and brotherhood is a condition people have to work at.  ~Maya Angelou

To the outside world we all grow old.  But not to brothers and sisters.  We know each other as we always were.  We know each other’s hearts.  We share private family jokes.  We remember family feuds and secrets, family griefs and joys.  We live outside the touch of time.  ~Clara Ortega

Sibling relationships – and 80 percent of Americans have at least one – outlast marriages, survive the death of parents, resurface after quarrels that would sink any friendship.  They flourish in a thousand incarnations of closeness and distance, warmth, loyalty and distrust.  ~Erica E. Goode, “The Secret World of Siblings,” U.S. News & World Report, 10 January 1994

 

Ricochet Rabbit: A Favorite Childhood Cartoon April 21, 2011

Ricochet Rabbit was my hero.

He was a cartoon character from a short segment on Hanna-Barbera’s The Magilla Gorilla Show. Ricochet Rabbit and Droop-a-Long were the law in the western town of Hoop ‘n’ Holler. Ricochet Rabbit was fast, real fast. He could race around and bounce off walls at the speed of old-timey animation. Nobody could catch Ricochet Rabbit. As a kid, I was little and fast. Nobody could catch me. I practiced bouncing off the walls, always hopeful that I would magically become as rubbery as Ricochet. I wanted to literally bounce off the walls. I thought that was soooooo cool.

My parents were in an informal bridge club. The games rotated and when it was their turn to play host they would pull out the old vinyl-top card table, open a can of black olives and a jar of peanuts, and make sure we had something to occupy ourselves in the back of the house. I was very young. I loved attention.

At the perfect time, I would blast into the living room where the grownups were playing bridge. I would run around the room, flinging myself against the walls yelling bing, bing, BING! Ricochet Rabbit. (Ricochet always referred to himself in third person).

That’s where the memory ends. I have no idea how my parents explained my bizarre behavior, although I’m certain that wasn’t the only dramatic outburst these folks ever saw from me. I’m positive I graced the guests with encore preformances of Ricochet Rabbit whenever my parents hosted bridge club.

_____________________

In fact checking this post I was amazed to discover that Ricochet Rabbit only played for 2 seasons, only 23  episodes. The Hanna-Barbera classic ran from January 14, 1964 – December 4, 1965. How (and WHY!?) it made such an impression on me is a mystery. But I still think Ricochet Rabbit was a cool cat, and I am pleased to write about him for R-day in the A-Z Blogging Challenge.

Perhaps it’s Ricochet Rabbit (who lived in Hoop ‘n’ Holler), that started my love of alliteration. That should have dawned on me when I wrote this post: Alliteration: Why I Love It.

And maybe Ricochet Rabbit’s propensity for referring to himself in the third person prompted this post: Writing About Yourself in the Third Person. BTW, the comments on that post make me laugh.

I still feel like Ricochet Rabbit sometimes. Bing, bing, BING!

 
Source: wikipedia.org / image: public domain
 

Q is for Quality: Quality of Life April 20, 2011

Filed under: general drivel — Langley Writes @ 1:00 pm
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sxc/dspruitt

After I wrote my P-post yesterday, I reflected on how the concept of quality of life is ever-changing. In the post (about popsicles, you can read it here) I described one of many fond childhood memories that did not require fancy trappings. Although a short post, the comments let me know the message was received the way I intended.

Quality is subjective. What I consider ‘fine quality’ may differ from you. A clear definition of quality of life is impossible to pin down.

The current economic climate seems to be shifting people’s personal definitions of ‘quality of life.’ Whether by choice or by necessity, simple pleasures are making a comeback. I’m glad.

Enough deep thoughts from me. Let’s test my theory.

Sound off…

What’s your definition of a good ‘quality of life?’

 

 
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