Langley Writes

about her rich and random life

Ricochet Rabbit: A Favorite Childhood Cartoon April 21, 2011

Ricochet Rabbit was my hero.

He was a cartoon character from a short segment on Hanna-Barbera’s The Magilla Gorilla Show. Ricochet Rabbit and Droop-a-Long were the law in the western town of Hoop ‘n’ Holler. Ricochet Rabbit was fast, real fast. He could race around and bounce off walls at the speed of old-timey animation. Nobody could catch Ricochet Rabbit. As a kid, I was little and fast. Nobody could catch me. I practiced bouncing off the walls, always hopeful that I would magically become as rubbery as Ricochet. I wanted to literally bounce off the walls. I thought that was soooooo cool.

My parents were in an informal bridge club. The games rotated and when it was their turn to play host they would pull out the old vinyl-top card table, open a can of black olives and a jar of peanuts, and make sure we had something to occupy ourselves in the back of the house. I was very young. I loved attention.

At the perfect time, I would blast into the living room where the grownups were playing bridge. I would run around the room, flinging myself against the walls yelling bing, bing, BING! Ricochet Rabbit. (Ricochet always referred to himself in third person).

That’s where the memory ends. I have no idea how my parents explained my bizarre behavior, although I’m certain that wasn’t the only dramatic outburst these folks ever saw from me. I’m positive I graced the guests with encore preformances of Ricochet Rabbit whenever my parents hosted bridge club.

_____________________

In fact checking this post I was amazed to discover that Ricochet Rabbit only played for 2 seasons, only 23  episodes. The Hanna-Barbera classic ran from January 14, 1964 – December 4, 1965. How (and WHY!?) it made such an impression on me is a mystery. But I still think Ricochet Rabbit was a cool cat, and I am pleased to write about him for R-day in the A-Z Blogging Challenge.

Perhaps it’s Ricochet Rabbit (who lived in Hoop ‘n’ Holler), that started my love of alliteration. That should have dawned on me when I wrote this post: Alliteration: Why I Love It.

And maybe Ricochet Rabbit’s propensity for referring to himself in the third person prompted this post: Writing About Yourself in the Third Person. BTW, the comments on that post make me laugh.

I still feel like Ricochet Rabbit sometimes. Bing, bing, BING!

 
Source: wikipedia.org / image: public domain
Advertisements
 

M is for Meat: Sweet Meat April 15, 2011

Just now, when I stumbled onto an idea for an M-day post on the A-Z Blogging Challenge, my heart started racing and I began grinning like a jack@$$ eating briars. All because… my sister is going to kill me for this one. I’ll get there…

In the south, we nickname everything. It’s fun, funny and creative. Often, we have many nicknames for the same person, pet, restaurant or whatever else we nickname. Growing up, my dad called me Punkin Head (Pumpkin Head), or Punkin. My head is not especially big but he still calls me that, among other things. My brother’s nickname is Bubba and I’m not kidding. He runs a successful business but never asks clients to call him by his real name. He’s always been Bubba. There were two Bubba’s in our neighborhood so, growing up, I always called my brother Bubba Watts and the other kid Bubba Brickell. Nobody thought it was odd that I called my own brother Bubba Watts because you almost always have to follow ‘Bubba’ with a last name in the south. There are too many to keep them all straight.

My sister’s name is Mary but, in true southern style, she had to have a nickname. She nicknamed herself at a very early age. She started referring to herself as Mimi instead of Mary. And because I put nicknames on everything-even nicknames-I started calling her Sweet Meat. She was my Sweet Meat, my baby sister. (By the way, Baby Sister and Baby Girl are common nicknames in the south but she managed to sidestep those. Now that I think about it, however, she would probably prefer Baby Sister over the evolution of Sweet Meat. I’ll get there…).

As time went on, Sweet Meat became Meat. Just Meat. And it stuck. So we still call my sister Meat. If you don’t know the origin of her nickname, I know how it sounds. It’s terrible to call someone Meat. And I try, I swear I do, to call her Mimi-but I just can’t. Meat pops out of my mouth every time I speak to her. It’s a term of endearment, a pet name.

She’s not really fond of her nickname and her husband, who came into the picture long after she was dubbed Meat, hates it. I try hard not to call her Meat in front of him but I know I do. I can’t help it. Her name is Meat.

PS – here is an article about Southern nicknames if you want to read more: Five Common Names for Boys in the South.  I could write 10 more of these articles and not cover half the subject.

Do you have a nickname or know someone who does?

 

 
%d bloggers like this: